Project Description

Intro KZN Some of these men were about to do something bad to their community because of their internal anger, but after these sessions that changed. 25-27 OCTOBER 2019
ATTENDEES: 73
CHAMP CAMP
HARRISMITH
- Zanele Dklamini, Outward Bound Instructor

REPORT: 

After being welcomed at the lovely Platberg Eco Park with a through briefing and opening circle the men were divided into groups to begin their weekend adventure.

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  • They were pushed out of their comfort zones both mentally and physically by a variety of challenging activities and exercises. As the weekend progressed their communication and discussion skills improved noticeably.

  • During the discussion times circles of trust were established and we saw men being intimate and vulnerable, often for the first time in their lives. The discussion groups became a safe space for men to share their pain and shortcomings and tears flowed as men embraced each other in support.

  • One of the tough stories of transformation was a man, a champion for HIV/AIDS education in his community, who met gangsters on his way to help a bed-ridden patient with their treatment. These men recognised him and were no longer interested in robbing him but instead they took a syringe and drew blood from one of them who was HIV+ and then injected the blood into his blood veins. They said to him that they want him not only to teach about HIV but to experience it. Lastly, they broke the needle and left half of it in his body. This event changed his life and turned him into an angry man without any peace. During the camp he made a commitment  to take up his role as a champion and forgive those who spitefully sought his hurt.

  • The Zulu speaking men were generally socialised to be strong and dominant toward women. The #Noexcuse program provided a new perspective which they received with open arms and were willing to try something new.

  • There was also a joyful vibe in songs and how the men presented their understanding of the key messages in the camp on Saturday night.

  • They were pushed out of their comfort zones both mentally and physically by a variety of challenging activities and exercises. As the weekend progressed their communication and discussion skills improved noticeably.

  • During the discussion times circles of trust were established and we saw men being intimate and vulnerable, often for the first time in their lives. The discussion groups became a safe space for men to share their pain and shortcomings and tears flowed as men embraced each other in support.

  • One of the tough stories of transformation was a man, a champion for HIV/AIDS education in his community, who met gangsters on his way to help a bed-ridden patient with their treatment. These men recognised him and were no longer interested in robbing him but instead they took a syringe and drew blood from one of them who was HIV+ and then injected the blood into his blood veins. They said to him that they want him not only to teach about HIV but to experience it. Lastly, they broke the needle and left half of it in his body. This event changed his life and turned him into an angry man without any peace. During the camp he made a commitment  to take up his role as a champion and forgive those who spitefully sought his hurt.

  • The Zulu speaking men were generally socialised to be strong and dominant toward women. The #Noexcuse program provided a new perspective which they received with open arms and were willing to try something new.

  • There was also a joyful vibe in songs and how the men presented their understanding of the key messages in the camp on Saturday night.

One of the main issues with this generation of men is they’ve mostly been brought up without father figures, role models and mentorship- so they’re kind of cast out to sea in a lifeboat by themselves.

Kevin Rutter

When I go back home, I would love to be a role model to younger men and impart to them the aspects we have learnt here, that they did not get from their parents.

Phehello Mhlapi

When I go back home, I would love to be a role model to younger men and impart to them the aspects we have learnt here, that they did not get from their parents.

Phehello Mhlapi

We have to learn how to love better, how to forgive most importantly and how to grow the young generation into becoming better people than the past generations.

Lucky Voctor Mashiloane

One of the main issues with this generation of men is they’ve mostly been brought up without father figures, role models and mentorship- so they’re kind of cast out to sea in a lifeboat by themselves.

Kevin Rutter

When I go back home, I would love to be a role model to younger men and impart to them the aspects we have learnt here, that they did not get from their parents.

Phehello Mhlapi

When I go back home, I would love to be a role model to younger men and impart to them the aspects we have learnt here, that they did not get from their parents.

Phehello Mhlapi

We have to learn how to love better, how to forgive most importantly and how to grow the young generation into becoming better people than the past generations.

Lucky Voctor Mashiloane

Men in the past have been bystanders watching his neighbor beat his wife. And now men are saying we’re not going to do that anymore, we’re not going to be passive.

– Kevin Rutter, FAN Facilitator

WATCH A CLIP OF THE CAMP